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Wednesday , 25 May 2016
  • New home supply down, prices up in GTA as April sets new records

    New home supply down, prices up in GTA as April sets new records

    April was a record-breaking month for the new homes market in the GTA, though the records broken were not necessarily signs of market strength. The number of new low-rise homes available for purchase dropped to its lowest level ever, while prices for these homes hit new highs, according to the Building Industry and Land Development Industry (BILD). On April 30, there were in total 2,751 new detached, semi-detached and townhomes available in builders’ inventory, just over half as many as one year ago (5,171). Prices, it goes without saying, also hit new highs: the average price of a new low-rise home in the GTA reached $864,181 in April, 11 per cent higher than one year ago. Detached homes are in a league of their own, rising in price daily. A new detached home cost on average $1,059,263 in April. BILD says the average price rose more than $13,000 in the ... Read More »
  • Rising housing costs taking toll on many Canadians: survey

    Rising housing costs taking toll on many Canadians: survey

    It’s a given that most people who own their homes would like to stay in them when the time comes to retire. The latest confirmation of this comes from Manulife Bank, which asked Canadian homeowners about their retirement plans: 94 per cent said they wanted to continue being homeowners, most of them preferring to stay in their current home, “during the first several years of retirement.” Aside from the usual sentimental reasons for wanting this, many of the surveyed homeowners are, quite literally, banking on their homes to see them through retirement. A large proportion of them say that their home equity will comprise 80 per cent or more of their household wealth when they retire. The question is, is anything wrong with that scenario? Aren’t we encouraged to invest in a home because it will become an increasingly valuable asset over time, as well as being a place to ... Read More »

Recent Posts

  • Algae-based packaging, multi-purpose garments win Lexus Design awards 2016

    Algae-based packaging, multi-purpose garments win Lexus Design awards 2016

    The world’s oceans are filling up with plastic garbage, so it is fitting that a possible replacement for plastic should come from those same oceans. A gelatinous material called agar, derived from algae and used mainly in food, could provide the solution to the world’s insatiable appetite for packaging. A trio of Japanese designers have won this year’s Lexus Design Award, announced at the Milan Design Week 2016, for their Agar Plasticity prototype. The team, known as AMAM, were mentored in the process by British designer Max Lamb, seen in the photo above. Their project uses agar, which is commonly used as a thickener in Asian foods. The team’s work was praised for demonstrating the most genuine desire to solve a serious problem. That problem is, of course, one of the biggest pollution crises of our time. In describing their idea, the design team drew attention to the “undesirable” situation ... Read More »
  • Electrical safety and design tips for renovating the kitchen

    Electrical safety and design tips for renovating the kitchen

  • Grey touted as perfect neutral for every room in the home

    Grey touted as perfect neutral for every room in the home

  • French fashion for your cat from Meyou Paris

    French fashion for your cat from Meyou Paris

  • Versatile, sophisticated white named Colour of the Year for 2016

    Versatile, sophisticated white named Colour of the Year for 2016

  • UCLA team captures CO2 in cement production, puts it into concrete

    UCLA team captures CO2 in cement production, puts it into concrete

    Turning a harmful by-product of an industrial process into a harmless raw material of the end product itself is the result of some “blue sky” thinking at UCLA. Researchers there have found a way to take carbon dioxide, which is emitted in large quantities during the manufacture of Portland Cement, and use it to make concrete. The production of concrete accounts for about 5 per cent of CO2 emissions in the world, so being able to use that carbon in making concrete would be “a double whammy,” according to the UCLA team. They are calling their invention Co2ncrete. The team developed their proof of concept by combining pure CO2 with lime to create “a cement-like material,” then using 3D printing technology to create small samples of the Co2ncrete in the lab. They are more interested in applying the technology more widely, to greater pollution sources such as coal-fired power plants. ... Read More »
  • NYC’s $4 billion subway station: masterpiece or boondoggle?

    NYC’s $4 billion subway station: masterpiece or boondoggle?

  • Mushroom-based material can replace polystyrene; Ikea latest to consider using

    Mushroom-based material can replace polystyrene; Ikea latest to consider using

  • Bjarke Ingels’ Toronto condos: playful form for a change

    Bjarke Ingels’ Toronto condos: playful form for a change

  • Don’t be a victim; never send money to someone you don’t know

    Don’t be a victim; never send money to someone you don’t know

  • UN cities report urges better urban planning to reach climate change goals

    UN cities report urges better urban planning to reach climate change goals

    A new UN report on urban development is calling for a New Urban Agenda to correct the “spectacular” failures of urban policy in cities around the world. The UN Habitat World Cities Report 2016 makes a strong link between the growth of cities and the UN’s sustainability and climate change goals. Cities, the report maintains, are the platforms for global and local change in the twenty-first century, spaces where economies, cultures, political and ecological systems converge. The continuing growth of urban populations gives rise to massive challenges that include greater numbers of people living in slums, strained urban services, unrestrained urban growth, rising inequality, and climate change. The report outlines a New Urban Agenda to provide guidance in how the world’s cities can align their growth with the greater global needs. Growth in the world’s cities has until now been largely uncontrolled, driven by a culture of short-term economic benefit, unbridled ... Read More »
  • Interesting times for banking industry as fintech growth soars

    Interesting times for banking industry as fintech growth soars

  • Survey reveals “confidence gap” between men and women home buyers

    Survey reveals “confidence gap” between men and women home buyers

  • New CIBC app makes mortgages available via smartphones

    New CIBC app makes mortgages available via smartphones

  • Global air pollution getting worse, not better, despite efforts: WHO

    Global air pollution getting worse, not better, despite efforts: WHO

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