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Wednesday , 22 February 2017
  • Healthy or hot, experts differ on where Toronto’s housing market is headed

    Healthy or hot, experts differ on where Toronto’s housing market is headed

    Rising housing prices in Toronto and the surrounding area bring out a wide range of opinions and explanations from observers such as bankers, ratings agencies, politicians and urban planners. Everyone agrees that home prices have gone up rapidly, but that is about all they agree on. An economist at BMO says the city is in a real estate bubble. The mayor says no it’s not. So does the city’s chief planner. And the international ratings agency Fitch classifies the entire country’s real estate market as unsustainable. All of them speak of supply and demand, which  drive every market, but how do they play out in this one? First the banker. Doug Porter of BMO wrote that the high prices in Toronto, which he bluntly calls a housing bubble, are not due to a shortage of supply, as is often said, but rather to “sizzling” demand, including from non-resident investors, fueled ... Read More »
  • Tridel company shows environmental leadership with textile recycling program

    Tridel company shows environmental leadership with textile recycling program

    This may surprise you: the second most polluting industry in the world, after oil production, is—fashion. More specifically, textiles. According to the advocacy group Circle Economy, when you consider the heavy use of resources, including land, water, energy and chemicals, required to produce textile fibres, and the fact that so much of the final product is quickly discarded, after having been shipped vast distances on fossil-fuel-burning container ships, in the “fast-fashion model” of production and consumption, you have enormous amounts of textile waste and unsustainable resource depletion. Global textile production is already at about 90 million tonnes per year, the group says, the equivalent of 80 billion garments. And that is likely to double in the next twenty years. Twenty million tonnes of discarded textiles are landfilled or incinerated in the EU and the US alone each year. Incredibly, most of that—95 per cent according to Circle Economy—could be re-worn ... Read More »

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